What Do You Ultimately Want To Become?


Job Interview Question & Answer: What Do You Want to Be in The Future?

Why Managers Ask This Question

A job interview question like “What is your ultimate career goal?” or “What do you want to be in life?” is personal as much as it is professional. This type of open-ended inquiry helps managers understand your long-term goals and level of commitment. They want to know if you are interested in growing with their company and how well suited you are for the position.

How To Answer “What Do You Ultimately Want to Become?”

When answering a question that details your goals, be honest about who or what you want to be. Even if your life goals are not perfectly in line with the company’s, you may still get the position. Be realistic and show the interviewer you are already working towards a bigger picture. Use examples of plans and actions you’ve taken to benefit your future self.

What Not To Talk About

Sometimes, a question like this can feel off-topic. Rather than rushing into it, be thoughtful and make connections. Don’t show disinterest in the job or be too pessimistic, either. Selling yourself short is never a good idea in a job interview. Also, avoid professional goals that are in favor of the company’s competitors.

Tips for Answering “What Do You Ultimately Want to Be in Life?”

Employers like to ask questions that highlight a candidate’s career ideas. They want to hire people who seek growth and have a long-term interest in relevant industries. Here are a few tips to help you talk about your life aspirations during an interview:

  • Be passionate when talking about your goals. Show potential employers that you have the commitment and drive they prefer in workers.
  • Emphasize your specific plans to advance in that career field to prove to managers your dedication and ability to give results.
  • If you are using the job you apply for as a stepping stone to a greater position, mention the skills you hope to gain by working there.
  • Provide positive goals that have good reasoning behind them.

Sample Responses to “What Do You Want to Become?”

Questions about what you want to be in life are broad. Read through some examples to help narrow down your topic. Of course, your answers should always be personal and specific to you. Check out the following sample responses for ways you can talk about your goals:

Sample Answer 1 – Sporting Goods Sales Associate

I’m very passionate about sports, soccer in particular. I enjoy being part of a team and working toward a common goal, but the thrill of competition is even better. Eventually, I want to become a Major League Soccer player. I practice three times a week and work out on other days to stay in shape.

I applied for this job because I appreciate the atmosphere of the store. I will love helping other people find the tools they need to step up their game. If I can encourage people to keep playing, then I feel like I’ve done my job, not only as a sales associate, but as a fellow athlete.

Sample Answer 2 – Pharmacy Technician

My end goal is to become a pharmacist. I start school next fall for my degree and will be working toward obtaining my license, as well. I want to help make people’s lives better through medicine. Being a tech here would provide me with hands-on experience in a pharmacy setting, where I plan to work for my career.

Sample Answer 3 – Coffee Shop Barista

Eventually, I want to become a published author. I’m currently going to college for my bachelor’s in English and then I want to earn a master’s degree. The culture of a coffee shop is full of artists, writers, musicians, and poets. Being around that atmosphere is very inspiring for my work.

Framing Your Answer Appropriately

Open-ended questions that ask about your future goals or where you see yourself in so many years are a great opportunity. You can talk about personal, professional, or educational goals, but be sure to frame them appropriately with the job. Showing that you are a focused individual with a plan to become better encourages hiring managers to choose you for the job.

Similar Questions Employers Will Ask

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Powered by ZipRecruiter