Outback Steakhouse Interview Questions & Tips

Hiring process information for an interview at Outback Steakhouse

Structured Interview Process

Outback Steakhouse hires top-tier associates to maintain warm and inviting atmospheres. With positions like host, bartender, server, line cook, and busser, the steakhouse requires a diverse range of talents for each location. Positions may require different skills, but a friendly and attentive attitude will make an individual fit to be an "Outbacker." To find people that match the desired employee profile, the resaurant utilizes a structured interview process, which evaluates personality, work experience, and aptitude. Sample questions to prepare may include:

How to Stand Out

Job seekers should arrive to job interviews early and prepared to sit with hiring managers for at least 20 minutes. Throughout the interview, job seekers want to show attitudes that fit the steakhouse's fun and friendly Australian-style cultures. Candidates need to answer each interview question with honesty and customer-focus. Answers should showcase a creative and fun-loving personality and always be provided with positive tones. Job hopefuls with open availability to work nights and weekends may gain preferential treatment during the hiring process. Applicants typically receive job offers within a week of completing the Outback Steakhouse interview process.

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook Interview Video

Video Transcript

Interviewer: Please describe your job title and primary duties?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: Yeah, at Outback, I worked both front of house and back of house. For front of house, I was a busser. In the back of house, I started off as a dishwasher and moved to line cook. In front of house, you would generally clean tables and assist the servers and help in that sense. Then back of house, I was the dishwasher and a line cook. As dishwasher, you would just clean everything up and make sure they have plates and silverware and cups for service. Then, as a line cook, I worked cold side, cold side/fry. You would prep the Bloomin’ Onion and other iconic Outback dishes. Yeah, that’s the primary thing.

Interviewer: What was the work environment like?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: Outback was a really relaxed, stress-free environment. For some reason, just the whole Australian idea keeps it relaxed when working there. The people they hire are really nice generally, and it’s a good work environment.

Interviewer: What was your favorite part about working there?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: For Outback, I think the best thing was the flexibility. If you wanted to change shifts with somebody, they have an online thing where you can just, “I don’t want to work,” and somebody else can pick up your shift and it was just really nice. That sense, if you are busy and you have something else to do, you can just easily change shifts.

Interviewer: Please describe the application and interview process.

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: Okay. For Outback, you apply online or in-person. They had a normal application that you can just turn in. Then they would give you a call back, they would schedule a one-on-one interview with you. The one-on-one interview would go over the general questions, who are you, what have you done, your resume says this. They would ask some personal questions, why do you want to work there, do you fit into Outback’s mode of environment. It was something like that. I think, for Outback, the best way to approach the interview is to show that you have a happy side. They like to hire people who smile and have emotions and show expression. I think for them the best thing to do is to be expressive and show your emotions.

Interviewer: What questions did the interviewer ask during the job interview?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: From what I remember, one question would be, it was like a scenario, especially for front of house, “How would you deal with this type of situation?” Say it was, I think, I can’t remember verbatim, but I think it was like, “If a customer is complaining, how do you handle the situation?” They just want to know that you’re not going to basically tell the customer off or anything. They just want to know you’ll handle nicely, put the customer first and stuff like that. Then I think since I was dual applying for positions for the back of house, they just asked if I can handle the workload. Pick up stuff and carry 50 pounds, work long hours, stuff like that.

Interviewer: How were you notified that you received the job?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: For this job it was also immediately after the interview. They would tell you that you’ve got the job and they would tell you to come in for training and schedule the training after that.

Interviewer: What set you apart from other candidates?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: At the time I was a high school student, so for me, probably the availability of working weekends. They probably liked that, that set me apart a little bit. I think staying flexible with your workload. It is a restaurant, so they have weird hours, 11 til midnight some times like that, so you’re working second shift. Being flexible with your hours, being able to work in the morning and working late at night is going to set you apart. Also, I think be expressive, show emotion. I think smile, that’ll help. They hire happier people, I feel, there.

Interviewer: What other advice would you give to a job seeker looking to gain employment?

Outback Steakhouse Line Cook: Yeah, for Outback, do what I did, maybe. Apply for front and back of house, unless you really can’t work with people, then stay in the back of the house. But generally, if you show that you’re diverse, then you have more available positions. If you’re looking for employment, just show that you’re flexible. It’s the best way to approach it.

Outback Steakhouse Hostess Interview Video

Video Transcript

Interviewer: Please describe your job title and primary duties.
Outback Steakhouse Employee: I started off as a hostess, then I worked there as a hostess for approximately eight months. I would seat people, greet them. Then, I moved up to be a server after that, and of course you have to run food, run other people’s food, take orders, go to the bar, get drinks, greet and keep everybody happy.

Interviewer: What was the work environment like?
Outback Steakhouse Employee: Very fun. It was very energetic, everybody was outgoing. Everybody liked to play with everybody else and get their stuff done. Very teamwork oriented.

Interviewer: Please describe a typical day as an employee.
Outback Steakhouse Employee: Weekday, weekend very different. Weekday was more relaxed, more time to kind of chitchat. Weekends were more hectic. You would go in and you had like a three to four table section. You would be crazy, or as we say, “in the weeds.” Just running all over the place, trying to keep up, trying to keep everybody happy. When I was a hostess, same thing: you would have a wait of about an hour, hour and a half, trying to keep them happy, cocktails, serving them samples of things, and that’s about it.

Interviewer: How would you describe the application and interview process?
Outback Steakhouse Employee: Very extensive. I remember the application was about six pages long. There was backgrounds checks, drug tests, a lot of personal information, like hobbies, and stuff like that. Then, the interview process… there was three interviews. The first one with the general manager, the next one was with the assistant proprietor, and the final one was with the proprietor himself.

Interviewer: What questions did the interviewer ask during the job interview?
Outback Steakhouse Employee: They wanted to know, basically, my strengths and my abilities. They wanted to know experience, stuff like that. If I ever had experience with serving, and actually I had had had experience with serving at that point. I had about two to three years experience, but it still wasn’t good enough for them, and that’s why they started me off as a hostess.

Interviewer: What other advice would you give to a job seeker looking to gain employment?
Outback Steakhouse Employee: I would tell them go for it. It was a great job. It was fun, very welcoming, and great money involved.


Outback Steakhouse Server Interview Video

Video Transcript

Interviewer: Please describe your job title and primary duties.
Outback Steakhouse Server: My job title is a server. As a server, I should take orders from customers, and I’ll help them to make a payment of course, whatever they want. Whatever the customers want, like drinks or any order. I’m always nearby them to take orders.

Interviewer: What was your favorite part about working there?
Outback Steakhouse Server: There’s a no-tip culture. There’s no tips needed. I mean, they just eat, I take the order, they just pay, and that’s it. No tips for servers or anything. It makes me… it doesn’t make me want to serve them. I mean, I really like this tip culture. I saw it the first time and at the time really, “Oh, it’s very good for servers, the customers, and everyone.”

Interviewer: How would you describe the application and interview process?
Outback Steakhouse Server: My friend recommended me to the job, because she’s already doing it, and she said it’s really not bad in pay, it’s not really hard and it’s higher than other jobs. And she said there’s a really big discount for Outback Steakhouse. I just went there to interview, and they just asked did I take waiter service and how old I am.

Interviewer: What questions did the interviewer ask during the job interview?
Outback Steakhouse Server: At the time, I was a university assistant, so they asked me how many units are you taking, and what schedule you’re available, and do you have a girlfriend.

Interviewer: What other advice would you give to a job seeker looking to gain employment?
Outback Steakhouse Server: I think the most important thing is patience. Of course, it’s applied to everything but especially Outback Steak or any restaurant jobs. Patience is really needed.

Outback Cook Interview Video

Video Transcript

Interviewer: Please describe your job title and primary duties.
Outback Cook: I was a cook at Outback. Started off as a buser, ended up working my way up to cook. I was actually – a bloomologist is the correct name for what I did. I made the blooming onions.

Interviewer: What was the work environment like?
Outback Cook: The work environment … Very fast paced. Very fast paced. It was good, though. I’m one of those type of workers.

Interviewer: What was your favorite part about working there?
Outback Cook: My favorite part about working there was definitely the employees and the customer interaction.

Interviewer: Please describe a typical day as an employee.
Outback Cook: Busy. Busy, very busy. That’s the best way I can describe it.

Interviewer: How would you describe the application and interview process?
Outback Cook: I came in, I filled out the application. I was called back the very next day for an interview. They asked me very basic questions on the application. Questions like, “What would you do in this certain situation?” Questions like that.

Interviewer: What questions did the interviewer ask during the job interview?
Outback Cook: The same thing. “What would you do in the case like this?” “Why do you feel like you should work for us?” A lot of basic interview questions.

Interviewer: How were you notified that you received the job?
Outback Cook: I actually was hired on the spot. I had to take a personality exam, I guess, and after I took the exam, he came back and asked me, did I want the job, and hired me then. I started working maybe two, three days after that. It was fairly quick.

Interviewer: What other advice would you give to a job seeker looking to gain employment?
Outback Cook: Definitely be yourself. Try their hardest to be a peoples person, even if you aren’t, because you’re going to be working around customers.

More Outback Steakhouse Interview Videos:

3 user comments:

  1. heather

    i’m applying for the job and have an interview scheduled. What questions should i expect and how long will it be?

    Reply
  2. Samira

    My interview at Outback was more involved than most of the people I talked to that worked there, so you may get an easier interviewer than I had but, from my experience –

    The first interview involved questions of how you would handle certain customer service situations and gave me multiple choice options to choose from (the interviewer read the questions and the choices.) She also asked me questions about my experience in customer service and to share stories of how I had handled difficult customers or what I liked or disliked about the job I was leaving. Be sure to be able to answer why you are leaving your previous job if you have one.

    My second interview actually involved a simple comprehension test as well as questions from the proprietor (owner of that Outback.) This interview took longer because of the test. The interview questions were basic and I was very nervous but still got the job.

    I believe what they are looking for is someone reliable but also someone who will fit in there. Working for Outback for me became like working with my best friends. The people there are close-knit and the ones that last are the ones that fit with the group atmosphere.

    Good luck!

    Reply
  3. joe martin

    Does Outback drug test?

    Reply

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